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Re: Stocks

Postby JudasIscariotTheBird » Wed Jan 27, 2021 7:01 pm

Transmogrified Tiger wrote:
CubinNY wrote:Dave Ramsey is great if you are already rich. Not so much to get yourself out of the middle class unless you want to live like a really poor person for a very long time.


I would say the opposite is closer to true. His program is probably closer to something like Alcoholics Anonymous where people who recognize they have financial issues can get a clear path to getting out of it. If you are already comfortable financially or you know yourself well enough that you don't have to have an abstinence-only approach to any type of debt, then the program is less useful even if the advice is logical.

Bingo. Ramsey is great at giving very obvious advice for people that just don't live within their means, or don't understand how interest works, both for investing and borrowing.
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Re: Stocks

Postby WrigleyField 22 » Wed Jan 27, 2021 7:02 pm

JudasIscariotTheBird wrote:
CubinNY wrote:
JudasIscariotTheBird wrote:I would say the exact opposite. DO NOT PAY SOMEONE TO INVEST FOR YOU. Indexing >>> some guy selling a bill of goods/"knows what they are doing".

That's because you are stupid.

Hey, man, I'm sorry, but there is a guy here who asked for advice, and I think you are giving exceptionally bad advice. No need to make it personal.

No kidding.

Without knowing Logans exact amount he's talking about, I'd hope and traditional financial advisor who isn't morally bankrupt, wouldn't even take his business if the amounts are as small as were talking about.

Now if you want to go way conservative and say if you don't have the money/scale to hire an advisor, stick only with savings or maybe a C.D. Thats at least defensible, though I'd disagree personally (although again, it really depends on the person, if you have any sort of get rich quick mindset on these things I'd say you maybe need the stability of a boring 0.1% interest bearing savings account).
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Re: Stocks

Postby jersey cubs fan » Wed Jan 27, 2021 7:23 pm

it's one stock advice michael, what could it cost, $1,000?
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Re: Stocks

Postby WrigleyField 22 » Wed Jan 27, 2021 7:24 pm

CubinNY wrote:
JudasIscariotTheBird wrote:
CubinNY wrote:That's because you are stupid.

Hey, man, I'm sorry, but there is a guy here who asked for advice, and I think you are giving exceptionally bad advice. No need to make it personal.

Here's some advice- when you are sick, go to a doctor. She is an expert at fixing sick people. When you have money and want to invest, go to a firm that does that sort of thing that has people who are experts and a good track record. They are experts. In Chicago, William Blair is about the best there is. I give them what little extra I can afford and they invest for me. I trust them and they've done right by me.

Unless you have lots of time to do research and not risk-averse, then knock yourself out, but don't be surprised when you lose more than you win.

Unfortunately the expertise required to treat an ill person is way more advanced than teaching some basic fanancial literacy and if Logan has gotten to the point of having saved money on his own, he probably has the capacity to learn to manage money in a safe manner in a limited investing scope.

If I already have heart pains I'm definitely am going straight to a Dr. If I'm just worried about my long term health, I might consult a dietician and my doctor and a personal trainer even go as far as enrolling in a limited courses to pick up skills to learn to live a healthy lifestyle.

If I'm very undisciplined about my eating and working out or I have really ambitious goals maybe I need long term support and guidance. I guess the same argument could be made if you are financially undisciplined or have very ambitious financial goals. But in the case of the former you probably aren't in a position to be investing at all. In the case of the latter there is still a lot of work to do to pick the right advisor as someone who can meet your ambitious goals, even accounting for what they're going to skim off the top for the duration of that investing life cycle.
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Re: Stocks

Postby CubinNY » Wed Jan 27, 2021 7:26 pm

JudasIscariotTheBird wrote:Yeah, I don't trust those advisors one iota.

You have a cartoonish idea of people who are experts at what they do. It's like you believe The Wolf of Wall Street is the norm. At the end of the movie, all those guys went to jail. Most people don't want to go to jail. An investment firm will ask you what your goals are, what risks you are willing to take, and a bunch of other things. They have to be transparent in their track record. Every month I get statements on my money. Every quarter I get statements. All the decisions are mine to make globally regarding how I want to use my money. I know I don't know how to invest and I don't have the time to do the research needed to do it on my own, nor do I have a lot of money to lose on bad investments.

Without trying to be too melodramatic, this is a big problem in America right now. We don't trust professionals. This is just one example.
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Re: Stocks

Postby squally1313 » Wed Jan 27, 2021 7:33 pm

I mean, comparing "if you're sick go to a doctor" to "if you have $10k go to a financial professional" is just an incredible amount of bonkers. It would take two hands for me to count the number of absolute idiots in college who went on to be a 'financial planner' or advisor or whatever straight from graduating with a 2.something GPA, with a bare minimum of additional education required. You're supposed to pay for the privilege of their 'expertise' so that they'll dump your cash into an index fund like literally everyone else has been saying here for free?
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Re: Stocks

Postby WrigleyField 22 » Wed Jan 27, 2021 7:33 pm

CubinNY wrote:
JudasIscariotTheBird wrote:Yeah, I don't trust those advisors one iota.

You have a cartoonish idea of people who are experts at what they do. It's like you believe The Wolf of Wall Street is the norm. At the end of the movie, all those guys went to jail. Most people don't want to go to jail. An investment firm will ask you what your goals are, what risks you are willing to take, and a bunch of other things. They have to be transparent in their track record. Every month I get statements on my money. Every quarter I get statements. All the decisions are mine to make globally regarding how I want to use my money. I know I don't know how to invest and I don't have the time to do the research needed to do it on my own, nor do I have a lot of money to lose on bad investments.

Without trying to be too melodramatic, this is a big problem in America right now. We don't trust professionals. This is just one example.

You have some valid points, but I think your approach is way to narrow of advice for most people.

Even if you need some hand holding, most online brokerages offer tools where you can put in some risk tolerance metrics and they'll spit out an investment mix, perhaps with an auto investment plan. Not to hold up the online brokerage too much regard, but both them and the personal advisor basically make money the same way, by directing you to the "in house" funds, but the in person advisor probably also tacks on a advisory fee. Basically a premium for that personal touch service. That's probably a waste of money for most normal people.
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Re: Stocks

Postby Transmogrified Tiger » Wed Jan 27, 2021 7:34 pm

CubinNY wrote:
JudasIscariotTheBird wrote:Yeah, I don't trust those advisors one iota.

You have a cartoonish idea of people who are experts at what they do. It's like you believe The Wolf of Wall Street is the norm. At the end of the movie, all those guys went to jail. Most people don't want to go to jail. An investment firm will ask you what your goals are, what risks you are willing to take, and a bunch of other things. They have to be transparent in their track record. Every month I get statements on my money. Every quarter I get statements. All the decisions are mine to make globally regarding how I want to use my money. I know I don't know how to invest and I don't have the time to do the research needed to do it on my own, nor do I have a lot of money to lose on bad investments.

Without trying to be too melodramatic, this is a big problem in America right now. We don't trust professionals. This is just one example.


That's more than a little bit absurd of a comparison. This isn't like, say, anti-vax. Most financial advisors are doing their best and not trying to actively screw you to the wall. They're ultimately salespeople after all. However, the structure of most advisor setups is wayyy more expensive than many folks realize, and there's a host of literature that proves that financial advisors don't beat the market and very simple fund strategies that anyone can do easily. If someone is more more worried about pressing the wrong button or don't have time to do some really basic self-education on investing, then a financial advisor may be worth it to them. I would guess the overwhelming majority who go this route don't understand the true cost when it comes to undermining their returns, though.
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Re: Stocks

Postby JudasIscariotTheBird » Wed Jan 27, 2021 7:47 pm

CubinNY wrote:
JudasIscariotTheBird wrote:Yeah, I don't trust those advisors one iota.

You have a cartoonish idea of people who are experts at what they do. It's like you believe The Wolf of Wall Street is the norm. At the end of the movie, all those guys went to jail. Most people don't want to go to jail. An investment firm will ask you what your goals are, what risks you are willing to take, and a bunch of other things. They have to be transparent in their track record. Every month I get statements on my money. Every quarter I get statements. All the decisions are mine to make globally regarding how I want to use my money. I know I don't know how to invest and I don't have the time to do the research needed to do it on my own, nor do I have a lot of money to lose on bad investments.

Without trying to be too melodramatic, this is a big problem in America right now. We don't trust professionals. This is just one example.

The people whom I have known from high school and college that now work as financial advisors, while probably not crooks (well, most of them), are in fact cartoonishly dumb. Taking a half-years worth of classes to get certified can't cure that, and won't make their decisions worth the price of admission, most especially for small investors. I think the misunderstanding here is not mine. Index investing can be exactly as catered to risk tolerence as your current set up, and it can (and honestly should) be equally passive for the investor. I don't think most people should sell themselves short on the "I don't know how to invest" idea. It isn't that complicated. The better places like Vanguard and Fidelity can help you get the right mix of investments. Both of them even have this awesome fund that is geared toward your retirement age. They slowly rotate from stock indexes to bond indexes as you get older, as one should probably start lowering volatility as you get closer to cashing out. So all you have to do is buy it...and that's it! As Tiger said above, you should be aware of the fees you are paying, and how that effects your return. I'm an online jerk so best ignore me, I suppose, but listen to Tiger and look into index investing. You'll get to keep a lot more of your returns. It's often significant.
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Re: Stocks

Postby Soul » Wed Jan 27, 2021 7:54 pm

JudasIscariotTheBird wrote:
CubinNY wrote:
JudasIscariotTheBird wrote:Yeah, I don't trust those advisors one iota.

You have a cartoonish idea of people who are experts at what they do. It's like you believe The Wolf of Wall Street is the norm. At the end of the movie, all those guys went to jail. Most people don't want to go to jail. An investment firm will ask you what your goals are, what risks you are willing to take, and a bunch of other things. They have to be transparent in their track record. Every month I get statements on my money. Every quarter I get statements. All the decisions are mine to make globally regarding how I want to use my money. I know I don't know how to invest and I don't have the time to do the research needed to do it on my own, nor do I have a lot of money to lose on bad investments.

Without trying to be too melodramatic, this is a big problem in America right now. We don't trust professionals. This is just one example.

The people whom I have known from high school and college that now work as financial advisors, while probably not crooks (well, most of them), are in fact cartoonishly dumb. Taking a half-years worth of classes to get certified can't cure that, and won't make their decisions worth the price of admission, most especially for small investors. I think the misunderstanding here is not mine. Index investing can be exactly as catered to risk tolerence as your current set up, and it can (and honestly should) be equally passive for the investor. I don't think most people should sell themselves short on the "I don't know how to invest" idea. It isn't that complicated. The better places like Vanguard and Fidelity can help you get the right mix of investments. Both of them even have this awesome fund that is geared toward your retirement age. They slowly rotate from stock indexes to bond indexes as you get older, as one should probably start lowering volatility as you get closer to cashing out. So all you have to do is buy it...and that's it! As Tiger said above, you should be aware of the fees you are paying, and how that effects your return. I'm an online jerk so best ignore me, I suppose, but listen to Tiger and look into index investing. You'll get to keep a lot more of your returns. It's often significant.


I'm comfortable that my financial advisers are providing good value and solid planning. However, everyone must do their own research whether that's going it alone or choosing someone to help, or a mix. There are absolutely a lot of slimy people out there.

Random thought....lots of shady realtors out there too. Like you said, a few courses and a test.
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Re: Stocks

Postby JudasIscariotTheBird » Wed Jan 27, 2021 7:58 pm

Soul wrote:
JudasIscariotTheBird wrote:
CubinNY wrote:You have a cartoonish idea of people who are experts at what they do. It's like you believe The Wolf of Wall Street is the norm. At the end of the movie, all those guys went to jail. Most people don't want to go to jail. An investment firm will ask you what your goals are, what risks you are willing to take, and a bunch of other things. They have to be transparent in their track record. Every month I get statements on my money. Every quarter I get statements. All the decisions are mine to make globally regarding how I want to use my money. I know I don't know how to invest and I don't have the time to do the research needed to do it on my own, nor do I have a lot of money to lose on bad investments.

Without trying to be too melodramatic, this is a big problem in America right now. We don't trust professionals. This is just one example.

The people whom I have known from high school and college that now work as financial advisors, while probably not crooks (well, most of them), are in fact cartoonishly dumb. Taking a half-years worth of classes to get certified can't cure that, and won't make their decisions worth the price of admission, most especially for small investors. I think the misunderstanding here is not mine. Index investing can be exactly as catered to risk tolerence as your current set up, and it can (and honestly should) be equally passive for the investor. I don't think most people should sell themselves short on the "I don't know how to invest" idea. It isn't that complicated. The better places like Vanguard and Fidelity can help you get the right mix of investments. Both of them even have this awesome fund that is geared toward your retirement age. They slowly rotate from stock indexes to bond indexes as you get older, as one should probably start lowering volatility as you get closer to cashing out. So all you have to do is buy it...and that's it! As Tiger said above, you should be aware of the fees you are paying, and how that effects your return. I'm an online jerk so best ignore me, I suppose, but listen to Tiger and look into index investing. You'll get to keep a lot more of your returns. It's often significant.


I'm comfortable that my financial advisers are providing good value and solid planning. However, everyone must do their own research whether that's going it alone or choosing someone to help, or a mix. There are absolutely a lot of slimy people out there.

Random thought....lots of shady realtors out there too. Like you said, a few courses and a test.

Do you mind if I ask what you pay them?
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Re: Stocks

Postby seanimal » Wed Jan 27, 2021 8:06 pm

probably money
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Re: Stocks

Postby JudasIscariotTheBird » Wed Jan 27, 2021 8:21 pm

seanimal wrote:probably money

No mind is preferrable.
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Re: Stocks

Postby Soul » Wed Jan 27, 2021 8:32 pm

JudasIscariotTheBird wrote:
Soul wrote:
JudasIscariotTheBird wrote:The people whom I have known from high school and college that now work as financial advisors, while probably not crooks (well, most of them), are in fact cartoonishly dumb. Taking a half-years worth of classes to get certified can't cure that, and won't make their decisions worth the price of admission, most especially for small investors. I think the misunderstanding here is not mine. Index investing can be exactly as catered to risk tolerence as your current set up, and it can (and honestly should) be equally passive for the investor. I don't think most people should sell themselves short on the "I don't know how to invest" idea. It isn't that complicated. The better places like Vanguard and Fidelity can help you get the right mix of investments. Both of them even have this awesome fund that is geared toward your retirement age. They slowly rotate from stock indexes to bond indexes as you get older, as one should probably start lowering volatility as you get closer to cashing out. So all you have to do is buy it...and that's it! As Tiger said above, you should be aware of the fees you are paying, and how that effects your return. I'm an online jerk so best ignore me, I suppose, but listen to Tiger and look into index investing. You'll get to keep a lot more of your returns. It's often significant.


I'm comfortable that my financial advisers are providing good value and solid planning. However, everyone must do their own research whether that's going it alone or choosing someone to help, or a mix. There are absolutely a lot of slimy people out there.

Random thought....lots of shady realtors out there too. Like you said, a few courses and a test.

Do you mind if I ask what you pay them?


Expense ratio is 1%, which I'd like to be slightly lower but I've seen people over 1.5%. They manage about 30% of our total portfolio. I'm comfortable with them because they are active with us. I've had advisers who you basically have to pester to get meaningful responses from. They'll jump on the phone and talk through investments that they won't ever see any profit from too, which I appreciate.

They don't manage our 401k, IRA, etc. I keep everything straight in Mint, which I recommend using if you have multiple accounts, real estate, loans, etc.
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Re: Stocks

Postby Sammy Sofa » Wed Jan 27, 2021 8:33 pm

seanimal wrote:probably money


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Re: Stocks

Postby abuck1220 » Wed Jan 27, 2021 8:36 pm

lol comparing a doctor to a financial guy that is just laughably idiotic.

hiring someone to manage your money might make you a teeny tiny bit richer vs doing it yourself.

hiring a doctor to do surgery on you will absolutely make you 1,000,000x healthier vs doing it yourself.

come on.
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Re: Stocks

Postby JudasIscariotTheBird » Wed Jan 27, 2021 8:39 pm

abuck1220 wrote:lol comparing a doctor to a financial guy that is just laughably idiotic.

hiring someone to manage your money might make you a teeny tiny bit richer vs doing it yourself.

hiring a doctor to do surgery on you will absolutely make you 1,000,000x healthier vs doing it yourself.

come on.

And that 'might' is in the 3-10% range on an annual basis, where the next year would have little to no correlation to the previous year. Over a long time frame, the chances of overpreforming the market as a whole are practically nil.
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Re: Stocks

Postby JudasIscariotTheBird » Wed Jan 27, 2021 8:41 pm

Soul wrote:
JudasIscariotTheBird wrote:
Soul wrote:
I'm comfortable that my financial advisers are providing good value and solid planning. However, everyone must do their own research whether that's going it alone or choosing someone to help, or a mix. There are absolutely a lot of slimy people out there.

Random thought....lots of shady realtors out there too. Like you said, a few courses and a test.

Do you mind if I ask what you pay them?


Expense ratio is 1%, which I'd like to be slightly lower but I've seen people over 1.5%. They manage about 30% of our total portfolio. I'm comfortable with them because they are active with us. I've had advisers who you basically have to pester to get meaningful responses from. They'll jump on the phone and talk through investments that they won't ever see any profit from too, which I appreciate.

They don't manage our 401k, IRA, etc. I keep everything straight in Mint, which I recommend using if you have multiple accounts, real estate, loans, etc.

If you're capable of managing your 401k and IRA, why not the rest of it? Keep that 1%! It really adds up.
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Re: Stocks

Postby Soul » Wed Jan 27, 2021 9:08 pm

JudasIscariotTheBird wrote:
Soul wrote:
JudasIscariotTheBird wrote:Do you mind if I ask what you pay them?


Expense ratio is 1%, which I'd like to be slightly lower but I've seen people over 1.5%. They manage about 30% of our total portfolio. I'm comfortable with them because they are active with us. I've had advisers who you basically have to pester to get meaningful responses from. They'll jump on the phone and talk through investments that they won't ever see any profit from too, which I appreciate.

They don't manage our 401k, IRA, etc. I keep everything straight in Mint, which I recommend using if you have multiple accounts, real estate, loans, etc.

If you're capable of managing your 401k and IRA, why not the rest of it? Keep that 1%! It really adds up.


You have a point. I don't have a ton of options on the 401k front. I think they give us 20, 30 funds to choose from (guessing). Without the options available, it kind of makes managing it easier.

I'm not going to pretend I'm all over this though. I make periodic decisions, usually call them up (whether it's their accounts or others), and ask their advice before I do it.
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Re: Stocks

Postby JudasIscariotTheBird » Wed Jan 27, 2021 9:15 pm

Soul wrote:
JudasIscariotTheBird wrote:
Soul wrote:
Expense ratio is 1%, which I'd like to be slightly lower but I've seen people over 1.5%. They manage about 30% of our total portfolio. I'm comfortable with them because they are active with us. I've had advisers who you basically have to pester to get meaningful responses from. They'll jump on the phone and talk through investments that they won't ever see any profit from too, which I appreciate.

They don't manage our 401k, IRA, etc. I keep everything straight in Mint, which I recommend using if you have multiple accounts, real estate, loans, etc.

If you're capable of managing your 401k and IRA, why not the rest of it? Keep that 1%! It really adds up.


You have a point. I don't have a ton of options on the 401k front. I think they give us 20, 30 funds to choose from (guessing). Without the options available, it kind of makes managing it easier.

I'm not going to pretend I'm all over this though. I make periodic decisions, usually call them up (whether it's their accounts or others), and ask their advice before I do it.

In my humble opinion, 20-30 options (assuming at least some of them are ultra-low-fee index funds) are more than enough options, and probally actually a few too many. And while there are certain to be a lot of little decisions here and there, your investments should be something you can largely forget about. News is much more likely to cause you to make a bad decision than a good one. Buy it, sit on it, and only change course if something in your life changes and it makes sense to adjust for it. Again, if you don't mind my asking, what are the periodic decisions you make that you ask their advice about?
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Re: Stocks

Postby seanimal » Wed Jan 27, 2021 9:16 pm

1% is a paltry sum for someone who doesn't want to have to engage with the details. and for them, the moment that the 1% becomes a big number in real terms is also the point at which the 1% feels like an obvious bargain

it's all well and good to be like "1% reinvested yoy is better than 1% cost" when completely ignoring the opportunity cost of trying to do so. ain't tryna sort through lots of noisy information to make a rounding error's worth of money during the time that i could be [insert anything enjoyable here]
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Re: Stocks

Postby Soul » Wed Jan 27, 2021 9:25 pm

JudasIscariotTheBird wrote:
Soul wrote:
JudasIscariotTheBird wrote:If you're capable of managing your 401k and IRA, why not the rest of it? Keep that 1%! It really adds up.


You have a point. I don't have a ton of options on the 401k front. I think they give us 20, 30 funds to choose from (guessing). Without the options available, it kind of makes managing it easier.

I'm not going to pretend I'm all over this though. I make periodic decisions, usually call them up (whether it's their accounts or others), and ask their advice before I do it.

In my humble opinion, 20-30 options (assuming at least some of them are ultra-low-fee index funds) are more than enough options, and probally actually a few too many. And while there are certain to be a lot of little decisions here and there, your investments should be something you can largely forget about. News is much more likely to cause you to make a bad decision than a good one. Buy it, sit on it, and only change course if something in your life changes and it makes sense to adjust for it. Again, if you don't mind my asking, what are the periodic decisions you make that you ask their advice about?


It's a lot to bring up here, but basically my company offered us some vesting stock options, and we have a house, then investments with them, etc. I have a look at the 401ks once per year and typically ask them advice on if I should re-balance, what fund mix do they recommend if I do re-balance. So I'll ask them things like, hey does it make sense to put more principle towards the house or more towards investments, adjust the 401k allocation or withholding (which we are maxxed out now anyway, but you get the idea). I like that the answer is not always, give us your money. And sometimes I flat out don't follow advice. I want my home paid off, call me old school and stupid, but that's what I want and I put my foot down on that.

JudasIscariotTheBird wrote:News is much more likely to cause you to make a bad decision than a good one.


So true. I follow a long term strategy which provides some protection against the news. But I'm getting closer to retirement and I worry about what happens when I don't have enough runway left to say that I'm following a long term strategy.
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Re: Stocks

Postby JudasIscariotTheBird » Wed Jan 27, 2021 9:29 pm

seanimal wrote:1% is a paltry sum for someone who doesn't want to have to engage with the details. and for them, the moment that the 1% becomes a big number in real terms is also the point at which the 1% feels like an obvious bargain

it's all well and good to be like "1% reinvested yoy is better than 1% cost" when completely ignoring the opportunity cost of trying to do so. ain't tryna sort through lots of noisy information to make a rounding error's worth of money during the time that i could be [insert anything enjoyable here]

I understand what you are saying, but that 1% adds up a lot faster than you are letting on. A year later is 2%. After 10 years, its 10%, and since that money should have been compounding in your investments, its probably closer to 13%. It isn't a rounding error. Its SIGNIFICANT. Hundreds to hundreds of thousands of dollars. For someone that is just getting started in investing, it is all the more important to learn how to manage your own funds so that you know what you're doing (which is NOT hard) when you have more funds down the line.

And I also think you are making investing sound WAY too complicated. It can be EXACTLY as uncumbersome as using a financial advisor with a very modest amount of time spend setting it all up to begin with, which is no different than the amount of time spent talking with or shopping around for an advisor. There is no opportunity cost for owning an index fund. You literally don't have to do a thing.

Tiger linked to a Boglehead thing back there. All anyone has to do is listen to Bogle talk for like 30 minutes, and they will know everything they need to know for investing for the rest of their lives. Its less time spent than typing out message board conversations.
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Re: Stocks

Postby jersey cubs fan » Wed Jan 27, 2021 9:29 pm

It can't be a good sign that 25% of activity in this 4- year old thread has been today
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Re: Stocks

Postby seanimal » Wed Jan 27, 2021 9:34 pm

JudasIscariotTheBird wrote:
seanimal wrote:1% is a paltry sum for someone who doesn't want to have to engage with the details. and for them, the moment that the 1% becomes a big number in real terms is also the point at which the 1% feels like an obvious bargain

it's all well and good to be like "1% reinvested yoy is better than 1% cost" when completely ignoring the opportunity cost of trying to do so. ain't tryna sort through lots of noisy information to make a rounding error's worth of money during the time that i could be [insert anything enjoyable here]

I understand what you are saying, but that 1% adds up a lot faster than you are letting on. A year later is 2%. After 10 years, its 10%, and since that money should have been compounding in your investments, its probably closer to 13%. It isn't a rounding error. Its SIGNIFICANT. Hundreds to hundreds of thousands of dollars. For someone that is just getting started in investing, it is all the more important to learn how to manage your own funds so that you know what you're doing (which is NOT hard) when you have more funds down the line.

And I also think you are making investing sound WAY too complicated. It can be EXACTLY as uncumbersome as using a financial advisor with a very modest amount of time spend setting it all up to begin with, which is no different than the amount of time spent talking with or shopping around for an advisor. There is no opportunity cost for owning an index fund. You literally don't have to do a thing.

Tiger linked to a Boglehead thing back there. All anyone has to do is listen to Bogle talk for like 30 minutes, and they will know everything they need to know for investing for the rest of their lives. Its less time spent than typing out message board conversations.


1% per year x 2 years is still 1% my dude lol
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